Infrastructure, Transportation, and Justice

Description

The way we get from place to place touches every aspect of our lives, from the burdens of commuting to the access we have to basic services like health care and food. And it’s inextricably linked to the climate crisis, as transportation makes up more than a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. Join us virtually on Tuesday, September 28th from 4:30–6:00 p.m. to learn about initiatives in Wisconsin and around the world that are focused on making transportation equitable, clean, and safe.

Register here

Watch the recording of the Sept 29th event here!

Moderator

Headshot of Carey McAndrewsCarolyn (Carey) McAndrews

Associate professor of planning and landscape architecture, UW–Madison

Carolyn (Carey) McAndrews is an associate professor in the Department of Planning and Landscape Architecture at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Her fields of research are transportation planning, policy, and design. Her research seeks to understand how emerging health, safety, and environmental goals become part of mainstream transportation decision making. Equity is central to these goals, and her research analyzes the distribution of transportation’s health impacts, as well as how people organize to influence transportation decision making.

Dr. McAndrews received her doctorate in city and regional planning with a designated emphasis in global metropolitan studies from the University of California, Berkeley. Her prior training includes degrees in economics (BA Brown University), urban planning (MCP UC Berkeley), and transportation engineering (MS UC Berkeley). In 2010–2012 she was a postdoctoral fellow in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health and Society Scholars Program in the Department of Population Health Sciences at UW–Madison.


Speakers

Caressa Givens
Milwaukee Project Manager, Wisconsin Bike Fed

Headshot of Caressa GivensCaressa Givens is a city of Milwaukee Advocacy and Projects Manager with the Wisconsin Bike Fed and has eight years of combined experience as a Safe Routes to School educator, bike-share programming manager, and community active transportation advocacy organizer for Complete Streets. She commutes by bike and bus, loves to walk places, and to bike camp!


Gregg May
Transportation Policy Director, 1000 Friends of Wisconsin

Headshot of Gregg MayGregg is an urban planner with experience in comprehensive planning for communities across several states. He has worked on public engagement projects ranging from affordable housing developments to bus rapid transit studies. He has written reports, advocated policy, and led coalition meetings to promote walking, biking, and transit across Wisconsin. Gregg sits on the steering committee for Wisconsin’s Coalition for More Responsible Transportation and is also leading efforts within the Wisconsin Climate Table and the RE-AMP network to reduce transportation-related carbon emissions. He spoke at the Governor’s Task Force on Climate Change providing sustainable walking, biking, and transit recommendations. Gregg received his M.S. in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of Michigan in 2015. In his free time, Gregg enjoys a cup of hot tea, cribbage, and any excuse to get up north.


Chris McCahill
Managing Director, State Smart Transportation initiativeHeadshot of Chris McCahill

Chris McCahill, PhD, is the Managing Director of the State Smart Transportation Initiative (SSTI), a program of the University of Wisconsin and Smart Growth America that supports a network of state transportation agencies from across the U.S. committed to sustainability, equity, and transparent governance. He also serves on the Transportation Commission and the Transportation Policy and Planning Board for the City of Madison. He has written and co-authored numerous studies on urban transportation policy, including a chapter in Parking and the City, and co-edited a special issue of Research in Transportation Business and Management. Before joining SSTI, Chris worked on the Project for Transportation Reform at the Congress for the New Urbanism in Chicago and at the Center for Transportation and Livable Systems at the University of Connecticut. 


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