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Wisconsin Energy Institute

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March 25, 2013

Designed in phases, the first phase includes five primary labs that focus on molecular biology, chemical engineering and organic chemistry research, a 1,400 square feet applied engineering high-bay laboratory for solar and biofuels projects, and a central NMR. Apart from that the new facility also features two videoconferencing rooms and an education and public outreach suite including biofuel demonstration gardens.

March 25, 2013

In the 1930s and '40s, many researchers studied ways to use fusion, the reaction in which atomic nuclei collide, fuse and release energy, to develop atomic weapons. Later, those same brilliant minds began to focus on beneficial applications of fusion, including developing plants that would produce electrical energy for society.

March 21, 2013

The University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Wisconsin Energy Institute will open Friday, April 5.

The public is invited to two days of opening events, including an energy career fair, energy research symposium and family-friendly activities on Saturday, April 6.

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March 20, 2013

The Wisconsin Energy Institute, which represents the sustainable and collaborative research it houses to find new ways to reduce and conserve energy, will open to the public in early April. 

The institute is a metacenter, connecting energy researchers from across campus and multiple disciplines, WEI spokesperson Ben Miller said in an email to The Badger Herald. He said the center brings together scientists from two different colleges and nine academic apartments.

March 19, 2013

Gazing out at the roughly 60,000 cars that cross the intersection at the Wisconsin Energy Institute’s (WEI’s) doorstep, the reason the building exists is clear — energy consumption and dependence on fossil fuels — and WEI’s research is poised to address the problem.

The WEI building at 1552 University Ave. will be dedicated Friday, April 5 with the public invited to two days of opening events, including an energy career fair, a symposium celebrating energy research, and family-friendly, hands-on activities on Saturday, April 6.

A group of UW alumni from the College of Engineering take a tour of the Wisconsin Energy Institute building, which is designed to use natural light to reduce its energy consumption. The building will serve as a center for clean energy research and education.  Photo: Bryce Richter

March 19, 2013

Gazing out at the roughly 60,000 cars that cross the intersection at the Wisconsin Energy Institute’s (WEI’s) doorstep, the reason the building exists is clear — energy consumption and dependence on fossil fuels — and WEI’s research is poised to address the problem.

The WEI building at 1552 University Ave. will be dedicated Friday, April 5 with the public invited to two days of opening events, including an energy career fair, a symposium celebrating energy research, and family-friendly, hands-on activities on Saturday, April 6.

Brown Gold

March 10, 2013

Driving the search for renewable fuels and chemicals has been the realization that petroleum stores are rapidly dwindling. Now, in the heart of Wisconsin, a project is underway to produce energy from a resource that is in little danger of running low: cow manure, or “brown gold.”

February 15, 2013

University of Wisconsin-Madison bacteriology professor Timothy J. Donohue has been elected president of the American Society for Microbiology.

February 01, 2013

Building on existing bioenergy modeling data, a team of University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers will develop an interactive tool and companion educational game to increase stakeholder engagement and accelerate policy development for regional biofuels production.

The team has received $345,327 from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI), Sustainable Bioenergy (SBE) Challenge Area.  

November 12, 2012

Using a biomass-derived solvent, University of Wisconsin-Madison chemical and biological engineers have streamlined the process for converting lignocellulosic biomass into high-demand chemicals or energy-dense liquid transportation fuel.

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